Heart Disease

Can Oatmeal Reverse Heart Disease?

Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at and get a free excerpt from his latest NYT Bestseller HOW NOT TO DIE. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking go to charity).

DESCRIPTION: Less than 3% of Americans meet the daily recommended fiber intake despite research suggesting high-fiber foods such as whole grains can affect the progression of coronary heart disease.

Oatmeal offers a lot more than fiber, though. See my last two oat videos Oatmeal Lotion for Chemotherapy-Induced Rash ( ) and Can Oatmeal Help Fatty Liver Disease? ( )

Trowell’s work had a big influence on Dr. Denis Burkitt. See Dr. Burkitt’s F-Word Diet ( ).

This reminds me of other interventions like hibiscus tea for high blood pressure (Hibiscus Tea vs. Plant-Based Diets for Hypertension ) or amla for diabetes (Amla Versus Diabetes ). Better to reverse the disease completely.

Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at and he'll try to answer it!

• Facebook:
• Twitter:
• Podcast:
• Subscribe:
• Donate:

Can Oatmeal Reverse Heart Disease?

Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at http://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free excerpt from his latest NYT Bestseller HOW NOT TO DIE. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking go to charity).

DESCRIPTION: Less than 3% of Americans meet the daily recommended fiber intake despite research suggesting high-fiber foods such as whole grains can affect the progression of coronary heart disease.

Oatmeal offers a lot more than fiber, though. See my last two oat videos Oatmeal Lotion for Chemotherapy-Induced Rash (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Oatmeal-Lotion-for-Chemotherapy-Induced-Rash) and Can Oatmeal Help Fatty Liver Disease? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/can-oatmeal-help-fatty-liver-disease/)

Trowell’s work had a big influence on Dr. Denis Burkitt. See Dr. Burkitt’s F-Word Diet (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-burkitts-f-word-diet/).

This reminds me of other interventions like hibiscus tea for high blood pressure (Hibiscus Tea vs. Plant-Based Diets for Hypertension http://nutritionfacts.org/video/hibiscus-tea-vs-plant-based-diets-for-hypertension/) or amla for diabetes (Amla Versus Diabetes http://nutritionfacts.org/video/amla-versus-diabetes/). Better to reverse the disease completely.

Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/can-oatmeal-reverse-heart-disease and he'll try to answer it!

http://www.NutritionFacts.org
• Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org
• Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts
• Podcast: http://www.bit.ly/NFpodcast
• Subscribe: http://http://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/
• Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate

46 Comments

    1. +ivan aleman
      Having oatmeal three or four times a week for breakfast is excellent. I
      myself like to have oatmeal with a little bit of good quality pasture
      butter and I top it off with some wheat germ, which gives me even more
      vitamins and minerals, which the body needs.

    2. Oatmeal with cinnamon (top 5 antioxidant agent) with hemp hearts, chia
      seed, flex meal, coconut oil, a little honey and almond or coconut milk

      Boom amazing breakfast………..breakfast of champions!

  1. Cheers for the video content! Excuse me for chiming in, I am interested in
    your thoughts. Have you researched – Trentvorty Irreplaceable Doctor
    Theorem (probably on Google)? It is a smashing one off guide for curing
    heart disease minus the hard work. Ive heard some unbelievable things about
    it and my work buddy finally got great results with it.

  2. Excellent informative video!! I have been following Dr. John McDougall’s
    “Starch Solution” way of life for two months now, and have already seen
    great results. The scientific, medical and empirical evidence is in about
    a vegan whole foods plant-based diet. Documentaries like “Forks over
    Knives” and “The China Study” book, and also the “Starch Solution” are full
    of facts to support this, just to name a few.

    1. +segamegadrive34 From what I understand although oats are healthy in that
      they have less sugar added than most cereals they are low in fiber. So a
      high fiber cereal may be better or if available adding a fiber topper to
      oats best.

    2. +segamegadrive34 From what I understand, the brand doesn’t matter. Oates
      are Oates, chances are they all come from the same source. My local SM
      brand is half the price of Quaker, and really other than the package, I
      couldn’t tell the difference. Also, Oates need not be organic. If it makes
      you feel batter to spend the extra money on organic Oates, go ahead. Just
      insure that they’re plain Oates, no other ingredients.

  3. I’m dieabetic and having heart flutters and im scared as hell I have three
    kids wife and baby on the way I can’t go yet I’m eating my oats everyday.

    1. I had heart flutters everyday until late week. I reduced my sodium intake
      and greatly reduce meats. I haven’t had a flutter in 2 weeks so far.

    2. Magnesium, potassium, coq10. In fact, calf liver and cod liver oil will get
      things beating well. I used to have lots of heart palpitations. My ultimate
      solution is 200 mg of magnesium, 100 mg of ubiquinol, 2 grams of taurine,
      and occasionally 2 grams of L-Arginine. Sometimes a repeat an hour later. I
      don’t get them anymore but I tried lots of stuff over the years. Magnesium
      and CoQ10 where the first things that worked, some (ubiquinol is a reduced
      form of CoQ10 but peaks blood levels by a factor of 4-8x more than CoQ10
      milligram for milligram). Later some very small studies on taurine at 17
      grams/day added to the mix and L-Arginine was always in the research but
      didn’t do much until the other 3 times were part of the mix. CoQ10 is an
      energy source for the heart, or energizer and low levels can cause sudden
      cardiac failure, magnesium is very low in the (SAD) standard american diet,
      taurine reduces cardiac stress and helps you relax and calms any jitters
      from caffeine, and L-Arginine produces NO (nitrous oxide) which lowers
      blood pressure and relaxes arteries.

      Oatmeal in this case most likely isn’t helping as it can spike blood
      glucose even with the fiber.

    1. +TheWildbill242 We had a discussion on this on his website recently. A
      fairly new study showed, besides all of the other possible negative side
      effects, statins increase your risk of type II diabetes by as much as 50%.

    1. lol. We need feminism in places like Saudi Arabia, but I’ll agree that some
      of the stuff they complain about in America is ridiculous. I’d call myself
      an egalitarian.

    1. Oatmeal only acquires gluten residues from being processed in factories
      that process wheat products. Oats do not naturally produce gluten. If
      you’re a grain-brainer or wheat-bellier, both Perlmutter and Davis were
      specific about this in their books.

      At any rate, their gluten phobia is absurd.

  4. i heard another doc say that oats are bad and that the body is unable to
    take nutrients out of oats as well as any other whole grain product..he
    says its MUCH better to eat greens, nuts, beans, mushrooms and some fruits

  5. The British medical journal says statins are useless! Latest heart research
    shows clogged arteries are not the problem the body finds a way round that,
    heart attacks are caused by the parasympathetic nervous system!

  6. It seems all high fiber foods are also high carb: beans, all whole grains,
    oatmeal, etc. I could see how these could prevent diabetes, but once
    someone HAS type 2 diabetes should they stay away from high carb foods?

Comments are closed.

Ancient All-Natural Chinese Secrets Shrink Prostate FAST!

" Discover How These Chinese Herbs Solved My Sexual & Prostate Problems Without Flomax, Viagra Or Any Other Drugs Within 14 Days! "

Stroke Management. Self-Care ( Part 1)

Click Here To Learn More!